The Inuit People of Canada
The Canadian Flag
The Canadian Flag
The Inuit people are also known as the Eskimos. They have lived in Canada for over 15,000 years. There were 12 tribes and 40,000 Inuit people in 1741 when the Russians invaded.
The Inuit People preparing dinner
The Inuit People preparing dinner

The Inuit diet consists of many different types of food. Mostly consisting of whale meat, caribou, moose, walrus, seal, fish, fowl, mountain sheep, bear, hares, squirrels, foxes, herbs, roots and berries.

The Inuit people knew their land so well, they could use its natural resorces for housing. They could build igloos with snow.
The igloo
The igloo


They lived very peacefully and didn't fight. Instead of arguing, when someone was upset with another person, they announced it to everyone else. Both people got ready, then held a story time. The angry person told everyone what was wrong, but had to do so by joking. The other person had to defend himself also using humour. The winner of the 'argument' was the one who made everyone laugh the hardest.
The Inpiaq Language
The Inpiaq Language
The Inuit people spoke in Inpiaq, but after colonisation if they spoke Inpiaq while at school the teachers would wash their mouths out with soap.

French Flag
French Flag

The French were the first to colonise Canada. In 1603 Samuel de Champlain (a French explorer) came to Canada. In 1605 he established a colony in Port Royal and then in 1608 he established a colony which is now known as Quebec City.

The Russians were next to colonise Canada. In 1741 they came to Canada bringing many diseases including small pox, which killed many Inuit people. Then Later Cancer became an issue because the
Russian Flag
Russian Flag
Russian Atomic Energy Commission dumped 6,800kg of nuclear waste. Russians also bought alcohol with them,which mean many Inuit people became alcoholics. It got so bad that they had to ban the drinks from the Inuit people.

Unfortunantly Inuits stopped hunting,
some even went to live in towns,
A traditional Inuit tribe
A traditional Inuit tribe
but others lived in poverty. They couldn't get good jobs because they didn't have any education. The government started a mining business to give the Inuit people jobs. However they still had bad health and poor education, even though they were sponsered by the government.

British Flag
British Flag
The next country that colonised Canada was Britain.They came in 1763 and took over Canada. In 1867 Canada became an independent country. They were now a country in the United States Of America and the population of Canada stands at 50% British, 33% French and 17% others.
The Inuit people today
The Inuit people today

Even though it's a 'Happy Ending' for Canada, the Inuit people have still lost their culture and sense of the land. There are still Inuit people that keep to their traditions but the truth of this story is that the Inuit people may now have a safer life than they did before these colonisations but they have still lost their culture and traditions.


By Maggie & Bethany 9.2 :)
(Mag-Beth)

BIBLIOGRAPHY


==" BC Archives Time Machine ." Loading.... N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2010. http://www.bcarchives.gov.bc.ca/exhibits/timemach/galler07/frames/index.htm.Creery, Ian. The Inuit (Eskimo) of Canada (Report / Minority Rights Group International,). 2Rev Ed ed. London: Minority Rights Group Publications, 1993. Print. "Encyclopedia - Britannica Online Encyclopedia." Encyclopedia - Britannica Online Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2010. <http://school.eb.com.au/all/comptons/article-9275079?query=inuit&ct=>. "Encyclopedia - Britannica Online Encyclopedia." Encyclopedia - Britannica Online Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2010. <http://school.eb.com.au/all/comptons/article-9275079?query=inuit&ct=>. "Inuit - History, Modern era, Acculturation and assimilation, Traditions, customs, and beliefs, Cuisine, Traditional clothing." Countries and Their Cultures. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 May 2010. http://www.everyculture.com/multi/Ha-La/Inuit.html. Sakany, Lois. Canada: A Primary Source Cultural Guide (Primary Sources of World Cultures). New York: Rosen Publishing Group, 2004. Print.

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